Death Bed Visions

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Researcher Stafford Betty

by David Sunfellow

Stafford Betty earned his Ph.D. from Fordham University, where he specialised in Asian religious thought and Sanskrit. Today he is a professor of world religions at California State University, Bakersfield, and has evolved as one of the United States’s most acclaimed experts on the afterlife. In 2011 he published The Afterlife Unveiled, his most popular book. A more recent publication, Heaven and Hell Unveiled (2014), is an in-depth description of spirit life, with an emphasis on how spirits progress from lower to higher planes. His tenth book, When Did You Ever Become Less by Dying? Afterlife: The Evidence, appeared in 2016. He has published three novels, most recently The Severed Breast (2016), a historical saga about Thomas the Apostle’s failed attempt to convert India to Christianity.

Dr. Christopher Kerr: Dreams & Visions Of The Dying

by David Sunfellow

Dr. Christopher W. Kerr is the Chief Medical Officer at The Center for Hospice and Palliative Care in Buffalo, New York, where he has worked since 1999. His background in research has evolved from bench science towards the human experience of illness as witnessed from the bedside, specifically patients’ dreams and visions at the end […]

Regrets Of The Dying

by David Sunfellow

My patients were those who had gone home to die. Some incredibly special times were shared. I was with them for the last three to twelve weeks of their lives. When questioned about any regrets they had or anything they would do differently, common themes surfaced again and again. Here are the most common five…

At The End Of Her Life, My Mother Started Seeing Ghosts

by David Sunfellow

Last summer, six months before my mother died, I walked into her bedroom, and she greeted me with tinny hello and a big smile. She then resumed a conversation with her mother — who had died in 1973. “Where are you?” Mom asked, as though Grandma, a onetime Fifth Avenue milliner, was on one of her many European hat-buying junkets. As I stood there dumbstruck, Mom continued chatting — in a young girl’s voice, no less — for several more minutes. Was this a reaction to medication, a sign of advancing dementia? Or was she preparing to “transition” to wherever she was going next?

Regardless, Mom was freaking me out — as well as my brother, sister and father.

As it turned out, my mother’s chat with a ghost was a signal that the end was inching closer. Those who work with the terminally ill, such as social workers and hospice caregivers, call these episodes or visions a manifestation of what is called Nearing Death Awareness.

The End-of-Life Epiphany of Roger Ebert

by David Sunfellow

The Death of Roger Ebert By his wife, Chaz Ebert As told to Chris Jones of Esquire Magazine December 24, 2013 Original Link We were on our way to a movie screening in December. Roger was having a hard time moving around that morning, and we didn’t know why. It was so strange, because he […]